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Category: Diversity & Inclusion

Featured Bookshelf: Women's History Month

Women’s History Month

Women’s History Month began as a week-long celebration by in Sonoma, California in 1978 which was centered around International Women’s Day on March 8. A year later during a women’s history conference at Sarah Lawrence College, participants learned how successful the week was and decided to initiate similar in their own areas. President Carter issued the first proclamation for a national Women’s History Week in 1980. In 1987, Congress (after being petitioned by the National Women’s History Project) passed Pub. L. 100-9 designating March as Women’s History Month. U.S. Presidents have issued proclamations on Women’s History Month since 1988.

Here at the UCF Libraries, we have created a list of suggested, and favorite, books about women’s history in both fact and fiction. Please click on the link below to see the full list with descriptions and catalog links.

Featured Bookshelf: Women’s History Month

For information about the bevy of Women’s History Month events at UCF, visit Office of Diversity and Inclusion Women’s History Month site.

WomanFest 2017 in ONE week

Just one week until WomanFest 2017! Smart women! Zines! Words! Bake Sale!

Tuesday, March 8th in John C. Hitt Library room 223

10:30-11:45 AAUW Panel on Women’s Leadership

12:00-1:15 Open Mic

1:30-2:45 Zine workshop with Dr. Leandra Preston-Sidler

Come for all of it, or just 10 minutes. Kathleen Hanna wants you to be here, so you can listen to Bikini Kill and Le Tigre all day.

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New Africana Studies online collections

In honor of Black History Month, the UCF Libraries and the Department of Africana Studies would like to announce the acquisition of five new African American primary source databases. These collections, which were acquired as part of a technology fee proposal, fill a crucial need for primary source material related to the far-ranging field of African Americana studies. They contain a treasure trove of unique material that will be invaluable to subjects such as Africana studies, history, political science, legal studies, literature, art, and more. Here’s what’s included in the package:

Black Abolitionist Papers: Brings together a disparate collection of primary sources that tell the story of the abolitionist movement in the voices of the activists themselves. The collection ranges from 1830-1865 and contains reform newspaper articles, essays, editorials, speeches, sermons, lectures and more.

Black Thought & Culture: A foundational collection that consists of 100,000 of documents spanning 250 years of African American history. Highlights include the transcript of the Muhammad Ali trial, a full run of The Black Panther newspaper, and 2,500 pages of exclusive Black Panther oral histories.

Slavery and Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive: 1.5 million pages of historical documents including 7,000 books and pamphlets as well as 80 newspapers and a dozen manuscript collections.

Slavery and the Law & Slavery in America: The most comprehensive collection of legal documents pertaining to slavery and emancipation. Highlights of this unparalleled collection include Petitions to State Legislatures, Petitions to Southern County Courts, and State Slavery Statutes, a master record of the laws governing American slavery from 1789–1865.

All five collections can be accessed via the Africana Studies database page. If you have any questions, please contact John Venecek, the Africana Studies subject librarian.

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Open Heart Open Mic Tuesday 2/7 at 12-1:30PM

Join us for a lunch break Open Heart Open Mic on Tuesday, February 7th from 12-1:30PM in John C. Hitt Library room 223. The UCF Libraries is partnering with the Women’s & Gender Studies Program to present an ongoing open mic event series.

You are welcome to bring a story, poem, song, or any other vocal presentation to share – on any topic.

For more information, check our event page.

UCF Libraries Bookshelf: Black History Month cover image

Black History Month

The national celebration of African American History was started by Carter G. Woodson, a Harvard-trained historian and the founder of the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, and first celebrated as a weeklong event in February of 1926. After a half century of overwhelming popularity, the event was expanded to a full month in 1976 by President Gerald Ford.

Here at the library we are passionate about celebrating African American culture and history (no seriously, I got a massive amount of emails with suggestions). We are proud to present our top 22 favorite books by, and/or about, African Americans, plus two streaming films.

Click the link below for full descriptions and catalog links.

UCF Libraries Bookshelf: Black History Month

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