News & Blog

New Africana Studies online collections

In honor of Black History Month, the UCF Libraries and the Department of Africana Studies would like to announce the acquisition of five new African American primary source databases. These collections, which were acquired as part of a technology fee proposal, fill a crucial need for primary source material related to the far-ranging field of African Americana studies. They contain a treasure trove of unique material that will be invaluable to subjects such as Africana studies, history, political science, legal studies, literature, art, and more. Here’s what’s included in the package:

Black Abolitionist Papers: Brings together a disparate collection of primary sources that tell the story of the abolitionist movement in the voices of the activists themselves. The collection ranges from 1830-1865 and contains reform newspaper articles, essays, editorials, speeches, sermons, lectures and more.

Black Thought & Culture: A foundational collection that consists of 100,000 of documents spanning 250 years of African American history. Highlights include the transcript of the Muhammad Ali trial, a full run of The Black Panther newspaper, and 2,500 pages of exclusive Black Panther oral histories.

Slavery and Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive: 1.5 million pages of historical documents including 7,000 books and pamphlets as well as 80 newspapers and a dozen manuscript collections.

Slavery and the Law & Slavery in America: The most comprehensive collection of legal documents pertaining to slavery and emancipation. Highlights of this unparalleled collection include Petitions to State Legislatures, Petitions to Southern County Courts, and State Slavery Statutes, a master record of the laws governing American slavery from 1789–1865.

All five collections can be accessed via the Africana Studies database page. If you have any questions, please contact John Venecek, the Africana Studies subject librarian.

"Familiar" by Jessica McRory, winner of the 2016 UCF Student Book Arts Competition

Exhibit: UCF Student Book Arts Competition

The UCF Libraries Special Collections & University Archives is pleased to announce the UCF Student Book Arts Competition Exhibit. Each year since 2005, Special Collections & University Archives invites UCF students to submit one of a kind books called artist books. Unlike traditional books, artist books are handmade to reflect personal artistic visions of their creators ranging from narrative storytelling through writing, drawing, painting, printmaking, and/or photography. The UCF Student Book Arts Competition Exhibit is a showcase of all entries created during the 2016 academic calendar year including past winners.

We are pleased to announce our winner is Jessica McRory for her artist’s book “Familiar”. The winner was selected based on creativity, craftsmanship, content, and design from our three judges – book artists Peter and Donna Thomas, and UCF Libraries Special Collections & University Archives Department Head David Benjamin. Jessica McRory won a purchase award for her artist book to be included in the permanent Book Arts & Typography Collections at Special Collections & University Archives. To celebrate the innovative work of all the participants, the UCF Student Book Arts Competition Exhibit will be on display during the month of February 2017 in the exhibition area on the 5th Floor of the John C. Hitt Library.

microphone

Open Heart Open Mic Tuesday 2/7 at 12-1:30PM

Join us for a lunch break Open Heart Open Mic on Tuesday, February 7th from 12-1:30PM in John C. Hitt Library room 223. The UCF Libraries is partnering with the Women’s & Gender Studies Program to present an ongoing open mic event series.

You are welcome to bring a story, poem, song, or any other vocal presentation to share – on any topic.

For more information, check our event page.

citizen-curator-project

Citizen Curator Project: Call for Participation

The Citizen Curator Project of Central Florida invites Citizen Curators to create a series of exhibitions for display at the John C. Hitt Library, the UCF Art Gallery, and online focused on the theme “Eliminationism and Resistance.” A particularly potent example of eliminationism, defined as social policies that seek to censor, suppress, exile, or exterminate others, is the recent Pulse nightclub attack, whereas the Orlando United campaign may be viewed as an act of resistance and reconciliation.

We urge participants to experiment, not only with a range of perspectives on the theme and historical source material, but also with the idea of what an exhibit can be. Anyone with an interest in affecting social change through exhibitions can be a Citizen Curator. This includes, but is not limited to, students, artists, activists, educators, and members of the community. No previous experience with curating is required.

How to Apply

To apply, email a 250-word description of your project to citizencurator@ucf.edu by February 15, 2017. Please include the type of materials you will be using, the desired or proposed location of your exhibit (UCF Art Gallery, John C. Hitt Library, online, other galleries or venues of your choice), your vision (include a sketch or image if applicable), and how your project relates to the theme “Eliminationism and Resilience.” Individuals or small groups are welcome.

More information is available at: http://www.cah.ucf.edu/citizencurator/

This project was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

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